AUTHORS

Disruptomatic
Angela Natividad
Angela Natividad is a freelance copywriter, journalist and strategist based in Paris. She co-founded AdVerveBlog.com, a blog and podcast about ads and design, and writes MarketingProfs' “Get to the Point!: Social Media” newsletters. She likes people and animals, but not as much as books.
Tweet her @luckthelady.
James Martin
James Martin is the community manager of music & TV tradeshows midem & MIPTV/MIPCOM. He edits their respective industry news & trends blogs (blog.midem.com & mipblog.com) and also covers video games and technology for French cultural weekly A Nous Paris
Tweet him at @jamesmart_in
Stuart Dredge
Stuart Dredge is a freelance journalist based in the UK. He writes about digital music for Music Ally, and about apps and mobile for The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Appside, as well as his own Apps Playground site.
Tweet him @stuartdredge
checkthis: super simple social shouting
OK so there’s tumblr (right here), and there are clever module-based online flyer offerings like webdoc. But we’ve rarely seen as simple and effective “digital posters for social media” (their own words) as checkthis.
If you’ve got something to say, you can chuck in text, photo, video (this playlist example’s particularly smart) and even polls and the like (cf. our own checkthis what I just made, pictured above), then share it on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest etc. 
Crucially, when you do so on Facebook inparticular, your checkthis is shared as a  proper piece of content (like a YouTube video, for eg.), as opposed to — god forbid — just a link! 
Yes, it is very similar to webdoc: but hats off to checkthis’ superior usability & overall quickness.
Try our poll & you’ll see! Plus we’ll be eternally grateful :)

checkthis: super simple social shouting

OK so there’s tumblr (right here), and there are clever module-based online flyer offerings like webdoc. But we’ve rarely seen as simple and effective “digital posters for social media” (their own words) as checkthis.

If you’ve got something to say, you can chuck in text, photo, video (this playlist example’s particularly smart) and even polls and the like (cf. our own checkthis what I just made, pictured above), then share it on Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest etc. 

Crucially, when you do so on Facebook inparticular, your checkthis is shared as a  proper piece of content (like a YouTube video, for eg.), as opposed to — god forbid — just a link! 

Yes, it is very similar to webdoc: but hats off to checkthis’ superior usability & overall quickness.

Try our poll & you’ll see! Plus we’ll be eternally grateful :)

AmEx: Taking instant gratification to the next level.

American Express illustrates its “membership effect” with a brand-new Twitter relationship. Securely link your card to Twitter, use specific hashtags to indicate to AmEx what kind of things you’re feening for right now, and you’ll get instant discounts applied straight to your account.

As they say at the US Open, nice serve.

(Source: adverve)

Greenpeace vs. Shell: The Biggest Social Media Heist Ever?
It first sprang to our attention with photos like the above (our favourite); hilariously bleak stabs at Shell’s policy of drilling for oil in the Arctic. The best thing about it was that it came from the Shell-branded Arctic Ready website, where it seemed the petrol company’s bid for web 2.0 openness had disastrously backfired. So why was the site, covered in satire, still up? Tweets to @ShellIsPrepared, the related account, were mostly answered thusly:

@runswithwaves Please don’t share offensive ads. We’re working to remove them. #shell #arcticready
— Social Media Team (@ShellisPrepared) July 18, 2012
Naturally, an increasing number of tweeps RT’d the Shell community manager’s increasingly catastrophic handling of this comms disaster; he/she was clearly making it worse. Or was he/she?
Fortunately, this rather handy piece in the Sydney Morning Herald summed up the whole campaign rather nicely, and attributed it all to none other than Greenpeace. Looking at the videos which started their attack, plus judging by the organisation’s past lampooning of Nestlé, this campaign has all the hallmarks, but goes several steps further. 
Rarely - nay, never - has a brand been so utterly and convincingly hijacked on social media; and what’s more, Greenpeace makes it look easy. And perhaps it is. You don’t have to have a ‘verified’ Twitter account to be believed; and any logos can be copied and reproduced willy-nilly, to make an apparently-official site.
So whilst Greenpeace may be moderately scared of a Shell lawsuit — for now, the oil brand seems to be denying the ecologists the extra publicity that would give them — it’s not just big ‘bad’ business that should be concerned right now. It’s all brands. Because social media is based on trust; and Greenpeace has just demonstrated how easy it is to disrupt and pervert that confidence.
A benchmark case, in more ways than one… 
Update: the Arctic Ready site no longer features all the user-generated ads, like the one above. And you can’t make any more on the site. Good job we kept the above one, eh?

Greenpeace vs. Shell: The Biggest Social Media Heist Ever?

It first sprang to our attention with photos like the above (our favourite); hilariously bleak stabs at Shell’s policy of drilling for oil in the Arctic. The best thing about it was that it came from the Shell-branded Arctic Ready website, where it seemed the petrol company’s bid for web 2.0 openness had disastrously backfired. So why was the site, covered in satire, still up? Tweets to @ShellIsPrepared, the related account, were mostly answered thusly:

Naturally, an increasing number of tweeps RT’d the Shell community manager’s increasingly catastrophic handling of this comms disaster; he/she was clearly making it worse. Or was he/she?

Fortunately, this rather handy piece in the Sydney Morning Herald summed up the whole campaign rather nicely, and attributed it all to none other than Greenpeace. Looking at the videos which started their attack, plus judging by the organisation’s past lampooning of Nestlé, this campaign has all the hallmarks, but goes several steps further. 

Rarely - nay, never - has a brand been so utterly and convincingly hijacked on social media; and what’s more, Greenpeace makes it look easy. And perhaps it is. You don’t have to have a ‘verified’ Twitter account to be believed; and any logos can be copied and reproduced willy-nilly, to make an apparently-official site.

So whilst Greenpeace may be moderately scared of a Shell lawsuit — for now, the oil brand seems to be denying the ecologists the extra publicity that would give them — it’s not just big ‘bad’ business that should be concerned right now. It’s all brands. Because social media is based on trust; and Greenpeace has just demonstrated how easy it is to disrupt and pervert that confidence.

A benchmark case, in more ways than one…
 

Update: the Arctic Ready site no longer features all the user-generated ads, like the one above. And you can’t make any more on the site. Good job we kept the above one, eh?

Yves Saint Laurent's Fans-Only Makeup Palette

The YouTube how-to girls will be going crazy for this one. To demonstrate its social love, Yves Saint Laurent Beauté is pulling a first in its industry and launching a makeup palette sold exclusively to Fans on Facebook.

The “Devoted to Fans” product line, produced in partnership with Facebook, goes live with the “Pantone Facebook” palette, of which only 1650 will be produced for the brand’s fan page

In an interview with FrenchWeb, marketing and digital director Carla de Préval of Yves Saint Laurent said, “Before I arrived there’d already been a number of cool productions, and since my arrival we’ve tried to push things a little further, to have a complete and global vision of digital — to separate ourselves from a completely internet-oriented vision and to really digitalize all points of contact.”

Definitely a hype worth following. The playful spirit that goes into producing a quality product for Facebook fans also reminds us of Jimmy Choo’s Catchachoo effort for Foursquare. Because we’re in a time when the fun and frivolous energy of fashion is being democratised, breaking out into the world and becoming contagious, like a fever. Ironically it took a screen to do that.

Facebook buys Instagram for $1bn. Promises not to kill it.

So much for public holidays. Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg spent his Easter Monday announcing the social network’s acquisition of photo-sharing app Instagram, in what TechCrunch is claiming to be a $1bn deal.

Our first response – well, our second response after yelling something unprintable out of sheer surprise – was to wonder if this makes Instagram the latest cool service to be bought and then shut down / run into the ground by Facebook. But Zuck says Instagram most certainly isn’t the new FriendFeed, Drop.io or Beluga.

We believe these are different experiences that complement each other. But in order to do this well, we need to be mindful about keeping and building on Instagram’s strengths and features rather than just trying to integrate everything into Facebook,” he blogs.

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