AUTHORS

Disruptomatic
Angela Natividad
Angela Natividad is a freelance copywriter, journalist and strategist based in Paris. She co-founded AdVerveBlog.com, a blog and podcast about ads and design, and writes MarketingProfs' “Get to the Point!: Social Media” newsletters. She likes people and animals, but not as much as books.
Tweet her @luckthelady.
James Martin
James Martin is the community manager of music & TV tradeshows midem & MIPTV/MIPCOM. He edits their respective industry news & trends blogs (blog.midem.com & mipblog.com) and also covers video games and technology for French cultural weekly A Nous Paris
Tweet him at @jamesmart_in
Stuart Dredge
Stuart Dredge is a freelance journalist based in the UK. He writes about digital music for Music Ally, and about apps and mobile for The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Appside, as well as his own Apps Playground site.
Tweet him @stuartdredge

You Know You Want To.

We give you the Romo. Inspired by the Bondi Blue iMac, it’s the ultimate way to make a robot friend out of what is probably already your most intimate companion: your iPhone.

(via fastcompany)

Everpurse: The Clutch that Charges Your Mobile Phone

Everpurse, a Kickstarter project by Dan and Liz Salcedo, enables users to wirelessly charge their mobile devices wirelessly and on the go.

Using the Qi standard for inductive charging, the purse itself must be charged for six hours on a charging pad before use. Dan Salcedo says that give your iPhone two times more battery life — meaning that when your phone’s going dead at a party, you need only pop it into the bag to get it back into service with a minimum of downtime.

There is no dock, but a magnetic charger within the purse pulls your phone down into the plug and starts charging it once you’ve slipped it inside. And the technology isn’t heavy: in total, the battery and receiver combined weigh a grand total of six ounces.

Find it in a variety of colours on Everpurse.com. Guys are also welcome — isn’t function the perfect excuse to go man-bagging? But if the murse is too girly for your taste, the Salcedos say they’re working on suit jackets and pants with similar technology. They likely won’t appear, though, until the Kickstarter campaign is over.

No worries, though — the campaign ends in six days and they’ve already more than doubled their hoped-for $100,000 funding goal. Minimum pledges for the bag are sold out, but you can still lock yours down for just $129!

Kicksaver

We love Kicksaver. It’s a new site to help you rescue Kickstarter crowdfunded projects in danger of missing their goal. Tell the site how much you have to spend – $100 for example – and it’ll find projects about to expire that you could boost over the finishing line.

At the time of writing, our $100 could save a short film called Faces Of E.V.I.L, a campaign by the Society for the Preservation and Promotion of Sapphic Social Mores, or a 'Locals Only' t-shirt for a skate park in Provo, Utah. Decisions, decisions…

(Source: pandodaily.com)

Bret Easton Ellis now disrupting Hollywood, courtesy of Kickstarter
Are we at a direct-to-consumer tipping point? No sooner has web 3.0 watch Pebble raised nearly $9 million on Kickstarter, than one of the greatest writers of all time has turned to the same crowdfunding platform to finance his next film.
The Canyons will be written by the author of American Psycho and Glamorama, and directed by Paul Schrader, who wrote Taxi Driver and Raging Bull, and directed American Gigolo. The project is produced by Braxton Pope, who says in the project’s presentation vidoe that the aim of using Kickstarter is to raise funds on top of their own, to provide ”more shooting days, and more resources to tell the story. The Hollywood gestation period is very long, so it’s tough for artists like Brett and Paul to tell their stories unfettered.”
As Easton Ellis explains, the crowdfunding platform was the ideal way for the trio to avoid working with ‘the system’. “When we decided to do this film without any industry people - without studios, opening up the internet to cast the film - it just seemed Kickstarter was part of this new way of making film, of making content.”
Schrader then nails what this whole quiet revolution is all about: creative control. This “DIY mentality, shooting with friends, with low-cost equipment, then the website, Facebook, Kickstarter… It’s all part of a new way,” says the director. “I think films right now are kind of where they were a hundred years ago: they’re being reinvented, right in front of our eyes.”
Easton Ellis, of course, goes one step further: “Using the audience as part of the creative process may be even more exciting than 100 years ago,” he affirms.
And as if to prove it, one of the rewards for financing The Canyons is Easton Ellis tweeting about YOUR film to his 260,000 followers. Might help!
PS: With BEE behind the wheel, it almost goes without saying that the film will be about “five twenty-something’s (sic) quest for power, love, sex and success in 2012 Hollywood.”
We can’t wait!

Bret Easton Ellis now disrupting Hollywood, courtesy of Kickstarter

Are we at a direct-to-consumer tipping point? No sooner has web 3.0 watch Pebble raised nearly $9 million on Kickstarter, than one of the greatest writers of all time has turned to the same crowdfunding platform to finance his next film.

The Canyons will be written by the author of American Psycho and Glamorama, and directed by Paul Schrader, who wrote Taxi Driver and Raging Bull, and directed American Gigolo. The project is produced by Braxton Pope, who says in the project’s presentation vidoe that the aim of using Kickstarter is to raise funds on top of their own, to provide ”more shooting days, and more resources to tell the story. The Hollywood gestation period is very long, so it’s tough for artists like Brett and Paul to tell their stories unfettered.”

As Easton Ellis explains, the crowdfunding platform was the ideal way for the trio to avoid working with ‘the system’. “When we decided to do this film without any industry people - without studios, opening up the internet to cast the film - it just seemed Kickstarter was part of this new way of making film, of making content.”

Schrader then nails what this whole quiet revolution is all about: creative control. This “DIY mentality, shooting with friends, with low-cost equipment, then the website, Facebook, Kickstarter… It’s all part of a new way,” says the director. “I think films right now are kind of where they were a hundred years ago: they’re being reinvented, right in front of our eyes.”

Easton Ellis, of course, goes one step further: “Using the audience as part of the creative process may be even more exciting than 100 years ago,” he affirms.

And as if to prove it, one of the rewards for financing The Canyons is Easton Ellis tweeting about YOUR film to his 260,000 followers. Might help!

PS: With BEE behind the wheel, it almost goes without saying that the film will be about “five twenty-something’s (sic) quest for power, love, sex and success in 2012 Hollywood.”

We can’t wait!

Two days ago, music artist Amanda Palmer launched a Kickstarter project looking for $100k to fund a new album, tour and art book. With 28 days to go, she’s already past $440k in pledges.
Big money raised on Kickstarter is already a big theme of 2012, mainly thanks to technology and games projects. Yet the crowdfunding site has its roots in the creative arts: musicians, filmmakers, artists and more. Palmer may be about to become its biggest success story on that front.
It’s well worth reading her Kickstarter page too, to see how she’s tiering the rewards on offer for fans who pledge. $1 or more gets a digital download of the album – 2,683 backers at the time of writing, but that’s actually less than the 3,259 people who opted for $25 or more to get a limited-edition CD.
421 people have pledged more than $125 to get an exclusive signed art book and CD or vinyl, while an impressive 25 have pledged $5,000 or more to book Palmer and friends to invade their homes for a house party. And so on.
What we’re wondering now is this: Palmer has already quadrupled the amount of funding she thought she needed for her album, book and tour. So what does she do now with the extra cash: does she tear up her plans and bump the ambition up a notch? 20-foot flaming on-stage mascots? It’s a fun dilemma for an artist to have.

Two days ago, music artist Amanda Palmer launched a Kickstarter project looking for $100k to fund a new album, tour and art book. With 28 days to go, she’s already past $440k in pledges.

Big money raised on Kickstarter is already a big theme of 2012, mainly thanks to technology and games projects. Yet the crowdfunding site has its roots in the creative arts: musicians, filmmakers, artists and more. Palmer may be about to become its biggest success story on that front.

It’s well worth reading her Kickstarter page too, to see how she’s tiering the rewards on offer for fans who pledge. $1 or more gets a digital download of the album – 2,683 backers at the time of writing, but that’s actually less than the 3,259 people who opted for $25 or more to get a limited-edition CD.

421 people have pledged more than $125 to get an exclusive signed art book and CD or vinyl, while an impressive 25 have pledged $5,000 or more to book Palmer and friends to invade their homes for a house party. And so on.

What we’re wondering now is this: Palmer has already quadrupled the amount of funding she thought she needed for her album, book and tour. So what does she do now with the extra cash: does she tear up her plans and bump the ambition up a notch? 20-foot flaming on-stage mascots? It’s a fun dilemma for an artist to have.

Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.Three Years of Kickstarter Projects
Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.
The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.
For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.
From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.

Three Years of Kickstarter Projects

Since its birth on April 28, 2009, over 50,000 projects have appeared on Kickstarter for financing across nearly all creative sectors. Around half have successfully reached their fundraising goals.

The New York Times has published a beautiful series of charts divided by sector: Film/Video, Music, Design, Games, Publishing, Art, Technology, Theater, Food, and Comics. The charts are headed by the total amount of money each sector has raised. Film/Video has raised the most, with $60 million. Music follows with $38 million.

For your skimming pleasure we’ve attached charts of epic, fully-funded Kickstarter projects for the following sectors: Fashion, Film/Video, Games, Music, Publishing and Tech. Also read the accompanying NYT article about crowdfunded startups, as well as an article about our own favourite Kickstarter project, the Pebble smartwatch.

From a sought-after $100,000, the Pebble founders have raised over $7 million — the fruit of a great video, a well-designed product worth covering, and an exceptionally well-structured Pledge Backing rewards system, several of which are already sold out.

There’s a lot of buzz around crowd-funding site Kickstarter in the games industry at the moment, thanks to some projects that attracted big bucks from fans investing in a cool idea. But Kickstarter is a complex beast: raising money is just the first step.
Read this update from a developer called War Balloon, which raised $36,967 on Kickstarter to make a game for iOS and Android called Star Command. The post details how this money was sucked up by prize fulfilment, legal fees and other costs, leaving the developers still more than $50,000 in debt.
"All that said though, its been great and the game would not be where it is if it wasn’t for kickstarter," they stress in the post, which is aimed at people who backed the project. "We’re extremely confident were going to hit our summer release date and that never would have happened without you guys."

There’s a lot of buzz around crowd-funding site Kickstarter in the games industry at the moment, thanks to some projects that attracted big bucks from fans investing in a cool idea. But Kickstarter is a complex beast: raising money is just the first step.

Read this update from a developer called War Balloon, which raised $36,967 on Kickstarter to make a game for iOS and Android called Star Command. The post details how this money was sucked up by prize fulfilment, legal fees and other costs, leaving the developers still more than $50,000 in debt.

"All that said though, its been great and the game would not be where it is if it wasn’t for kickstarter," they stress in the post, which is aimed at people who backed the project. "We’re extremely confident were going to hit our summer release date and that never would have happened without you guys."

I want a Pebble smart watch. I MUST HAVE ONE. It seems like a lot of other people agree: more than 13,300 people have pledged money to its Kickstarter campaign, generating $1.8m for its manufacturer to actually make it.

What is it? A stylish-looking watch that connects to your iPhone or Android smartphone via Bluetooth to get alerts when someone calls, texts or emails you. But it can also run apps, like fitness, sports and music.

It’ll cost $150+ when it goes on sale in the Autumn, but a pledge of $115 gets you on the list for the initial run. Or you can pledge $1,000 to get a ‘distributor pack’ of 10, or $1,250 for a custom watchface created “just for you”. Amazing.