AUTHORS

Disruptomatic
Angela Natividad
Angela Natividad is a freelance copywriter, journalist and strategist based in Paris. She co-founded AdVerveBlog.com, a blog and podcast about ads and design, and writes MarketingProfs' “Get to the Point!: Social Media” newsletters. She likes people and animals, but not as much as books.
Tweet her @luckthelady.
James Martin
James Martin is the community manager of music & TV tradeshows midem & MIPTV/MIPCOM. He edits their respective industry news & trends blogs (blog.midem.com & mipblog.com) and also covers video games and technology for French cultural weekly A Nous Paris
Tweet him at @jamesmart_in
Stuart Dredge
Stuart Dredge is a freelance journalist based in the UK. He writes about digital music for Music Ally, and about apps and mobile for The Guardian, The Sunday Times and The Appside, as well as his own Apps Playground site.
Tweet him @stuartdredge

Zombie ‘Walkers’ Attack Twitter Users!

Our Follow list is crawling with walkers. And you thought the internet was safe!

French network NT1, which has just licensed Walking Dead for syndication in France, is running a guerrilla operation that gives people the thrill of being zombie-stalked … from Twitter.

A news article on their Walking Dead subsite alerts users to a “zombie virus” that’s contaminated NT1 employees. To avoid contamination, you’re advised:

  • NOT to Tweet the #walkingdeadNT1 hashtag
  • NOT to comment on #walkingdeadNT1 posts on Facebook
  • NOT to comment on the site.

The article went live yesterday. Since then, hundreds of people have tweeted the hashtag:

When you tweet it, a huge array of zombies starts following you on Twitter and will sometimes even @ you to go, “AAAAAAAH!”

No bites yet, but do you really want to risk it…?

Nice work by social TV agency Darewin. Noting that Twitter has taken to deleting the zombie accounts mere hours after they’ve been created, founder Wale Oyekanmi just laughed. “They follow you, you look at the accounts, and maybe some are dead,” he told us. “It’s coherent with the strategy.” In an ideal world, zombies don’t live long anyway. 

YouTube Launching 13 French Networks: ‘Producers’ Include Agencies, Websites

It’s all happening. This October, YouTube is launching 13 themed networks for France, which will appear both on the web and on connected TVs.

An RFP was released for programmes to populate the networks, a process that sticks out especially because it wasn’t only major production firms that could enter; agencies and websites were also eligible. Brands that made the cut include production firm Endemol, agency Capa, website Auféminin.com (for women) alongside sister site Marmiton (for cooking); and “new generation” producer “Troisième Oeil” (“Third Eye”). Jean Dujardin, who made a big Stateside splash this year, has also been asked get involved in a comedy project.

The budget for partnering producers may range from 500,000€ to 1,000,000€ for the development of 20 hours of programming. The networks will be closely themed around family, health, cuisine or culture, and — crazier still — the annual programming budget is roughly the equivalent of French primetime network TF1.

Ad profits above and beyond a promised minimum will be split between content creators and YouTube, although pending contracts suggest that producer margins will be squeezed. Producers will also be forbidden from airing their programmes on other media for the first year.

Similar deals are currently being made for YouTube network launches in Germany and the UK.

Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown
For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.
Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.
The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.
“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 
There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.
To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.
See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.

Fashion 2.0: 14 Dresses in a Single Ballgown

For the launch of his Fall/Winter 2012-2013 collections on July 4 in Paris, designer Franck Sorbier saved a nightmarish amount of fabric and thread by going almost fully digital: sharing 14 new dresses with the world by projecting each creation onto one enormous flowing white ball gown.

Two models were used as his designs unfolded in the form of a fairy tale. One played the princess and one played the sorceress. The sorceress (at right) used a laptop to cycle through the collection projected onto the gown while recounting Donkeyskin, the tale of a king determined to marry his daughter to fulfill his wife’s dying wishes.

The daughter, hoping to avoid this destiny, finds a fairy godmother who tells her to make impossible dowry demands, like a dress the colour of the sky and a frock as bright as the sun.

“It’s about how with a little imagination you can bring together two worlds that are diametrically opposed,” said Sorbier, “and it is about how we can take haute couture into the future to ensure it survives.” 

There are worse bedmates than tech and high fashion. Remember when Johanna Blakley said non-copyrighted industries — including fashion — tend to innovate and compete more readily than copyright-protected ones? It’s right up there with cars and food.

To be fair, Jeremy Danté points out the show bears a reasonable resemblance to Viktor & Rolf’s Blue Screen Collection in 2002 — another really cool concept where small elements of couture hosted luminous and ever-changing projections. But if this is the future, we don’t ever want to go back. Not if it means the stress of staring into the cavernous depths of The Closet could be wiped away forever, relegated to quaint past as our chic white space jumpsuits change colour swatches for us.

See the full gallery of images at Hello Magazine.

"Does Twitter menace the presidential election?" Such was the leading question of free French daily Direct Matin today. Some strange legal loophole (France is riddled with them) means national press can’t reveal the results until 8pm, whereas they are available mid-afternoon. As this ridiculous law doesn’t apply outside France, papers in countries like Switzerland plan to publish the results of the first round of voting April 22 at 4.30pm; and some in France have threatened to do so too… Thereby risking a fine of up to €75,000! 

The thinking is that if there’s a difference between results announced at 4pm and 8pm, candidates can contest the vote and ultimately get the whole thing redone.

So why the Twitter bashing? Well, it seems obvious that plenty of people will tweet early results as soon as possible via Swiss and other sites, in a mad rush for RTs and follows. This would’ve been pointless at the last election: no one was on Twitter in France in 2007. 

So now let’s blame it for whatever we can. Funnier still: Jean-Luc Morandini, star presenter on Direct 8, is threatening to reveal the results early this year. In 2007, he made the same threat, only to bottle out in the end. Cerise sur le gâteau: both Direct Matin and Direct 8 are owned by Vincent Bolloré, the media mogul on whose yacht Sarkozy had his infamous first post-election free holiday. 

Could this article as such be a thinly-veiled “don’t tweet” order? Hmmm…

"Does Twitter menace the presidential election?" Such was the leading question of free French daily Direct Matin today. Some strange legal loophole (France is riddled with them) means national press can’t reveal the results until 8pm, whereas they are available mid-afternoon. As this ridiculous law doesn’t apply outside France, papers in countries like Switzerland plan to publish the results of the first round of voting April 22 at 4.30pm; and some in France have threatened to do so too… Thereby risking a fine of up to €75,000!

The thinking is that if there’s a difference between results announced at 4pm and 8pm, candidates can contest the vote and ultimately get the whole thing redone.

So why the Twitter bashing? Well, it seems obvious that plenty of people will tweet early results as soon as possible via Swiss and other sites, in a mad rush for RTs and follows. This would’ve been pointless at the last election: no one was on Twitter in France in 2007.

So now let’s blame it for whatever we can. Funnier still: Jean-Luc Morandini, star presenter on Direct 8, is threatening to reveal the results early this year. In 2007, he made the same threat, only to bottle out in the end. Cerise sur le gâteau: both Direct Matin and Direct 8 are owned by Vincent Bolloré, the media mogul on whose yacht Sarkozy had his infamous first post-election free holiday.

Could this article as such be a thinly-veiled “don’t tweet” order? Hmmm…